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Tuesday, March 2, 2021

#ReadThis @AgathaChristie @HarperCollins @Morrow_PB #DeathintheClouds by #AgathaChristie #Eleventh #11 #HerculePoirot #Mystery

This post is for all our friends in the aviation industry.  You know who you are!

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Not only is Agatha Christie the Queen of Mystery but also she's becoming the Queen of this column.  We don't think we've featured anyone else eleven times!  Previously on Whom You Know we featured the great detective Hercule Poirot beaucoup de times:

The Mysterious Affair at Styles

Murder on the Links

Poirot Investigates

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd

The Big Four

The Mystery of the Blue Train

Peril at End House

Lord Edgware Dies

Murder on the Orient Express

Three Act Tragedy 

and we took a break from only him and did him with others in Midwinter Murder:

Take us away!  Death in the Clouds has come just at the right time as the vaccine is being distributed and we all want to be inspired to get away.  Until then, you know what you should be reading and Agatha Christie's reach from the grave is going even further than we knew before in our last review; it influenced The Head by HBO Max: read our review here.

It is the eleventh Hercule Poirot mystery and bien sur mes amies as the title indicates, it takes place on a plane.  Considering this was written in 1935 she was way ahead of her time.  TSA workers should read this especially!

As usual, you will be constantly questioning whether everyone is exactly what they say they are, and red herrings swim in the pages.  Like Poirot says, everyone keeps something back!  (p.99)  Agatha draws on her firsthand experience with poisons again here and even Poirot himself is questioned as the murderer.  Love, money and murder, Death in the Clouds has it all!

We wonder if Agatha read The Sun Also Rises from 1926.  On p. 130 of Death in the Clouds there's a reference to "we could have a marvelous live together..." which naturally to us echoes p. 198 of Hemingway here: "Isn't it pretty to think so?"

We will not explain the quotes here because the point is for you to read it and for us not to give it away.  Some gems include:

"'Oh well,' she said.  'I think I'd rather be regarded as a mere luxury and self-indulgence, than regarded sternly as a First Duty.  I'd rather a man felt that he was enjoying himself looking after me than that he should feel I was a duty to be attended to.'" (p. 141)

"'Meekness doesn't pay in this life- but I don't think we're either of us troubled by too much of that." (p. 136)

of course she uses WHOM correctly:
"'I am old-fashioned in my methods.  I follow the old adage: seek whom the crime benefits.'" (p. 158)

Read carefully.  See if statements agree.  Use your grey cells and your eyes to read between the lines.  All becomes clear with the wave of the Christie wand at the conclusion giving the reader supreme satisfaction, as always.

Death the Clouds is Highly Recommended by Whom You Know!
Epatant!






About the Author
Agatha Christie is the most widely published author of all time and in any language, outsold only in the Bible and Shakespeare. Her books have sold more than a billion copies in English and another billion in a hundred foreign languages. She is the author of eighty crime novels and short-story collections, around thirty plays, two memoirs, and six novels written under the name Mary Westmacott

She first tried her hand at detective fiction while working in a hospital dispensary during World War I, creating the now-legendary Hercule Prior with her debut novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles. In 1930, Miss Jane Marple made her first full-length novel appearance in The Murder at the Vicarage, quickly becoming another beloved and enduring character to rival Poirot's popularity. Additional series characters include the husband-and wife crime-fighting team of Tommy and Tuppence Beresford, private investigator Parker Pyne, and Scotland Yard detectives Superintendent Battle and Inspector Japp.

Many of Christie's novels and short stories were adapted into plays, films, and television series. The Mousetrap opened in 1952 and is the longest running play in history. Academy Award-nominated actor and director Kenneth Branagh helmed the acclaimed major motion picture Murder on the Orient Express in 2017 and its sequel, Death on the Nile, starring in both films as the Belgian detective. On the small screen Poirot has been most memorably portrayed by David Suchet, and Miss Marple by Joan Hickson and subsequently Geraldine McEwan and Julia McKenzie.

Christie was first married to Archibald Christie and then to archaeologist Sir Max Mallowan, whom she accompanied on expeditions to countries that would also serve as the settings for many of her novels. In 1971 she achieved one of Britain's highest honors when she was made a Dame of the British Empire. She died in 1976 at the age of eighty-five. The one-hundred-year anniversary of Agatha Christie stories and the debut of Hercule Poirot was celebrated around the world in 2020. Whom You Know will never stop celebrating it!

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#NewYorkNotes #63rdGrammys @RecordingAcad 63RD GRAMMY AWARDS PREMIERE CEREMONY® TO BE STREAMED LIVE VIA GRAMMY.COM ON SUNDAY, MARCH 14 AT 12:00 P.M. PT Our Coverage Sponsored by Cosmopolitan Dental, Official Dentist of Whom You Know @GaroNazarianDDS #cosmopolitandental #loveyoursmile

The Best Dentist in Manhattan & Official Dentist of Whom You Know:





30 E. 40th Suite 1001

(212) 683-1960

Dr. Garo Nazarian is a Mover and Shaker, and was the first featured: http://www.whomyouknow.com/2009/01/movers-and-shakers-dr-garo-nazarian-of.html

Dr. Nazarian, a graduate of Boston College and Columbia Dental School, opened Cosmopolitan Dental in 2006 and has grown his practice to over 3,000 patients. Peachy Deegan is proud to be the second ever. Cosmopolitan Dental strives to surpass all patients' expectations by catering to your dental needs while providing the utmost professional results. Cosmopolitan Dental has been recognized by America's Top Dentists and has earned both the Patients' choice award and the Doctors' choice award. Dr. Garo Nazarian is a proud member of the New York State Dental Association, New York County Dental Society and the American Dental Association. Cosmopolitan Dental loves to make you smile!

***

JHENÉ AIKO WILL HOST; BURNA BOY, TERRI LYNE CARRINGTON + SOCIAL SCIENCE, JIMMY "DUCK" HOLMES, IGOR LEVIT, LIDO PIMIENTA AND RUFUS WAINWRIGHT WILL PERFORM; SHOW WILL OPEN WITH A SPECIAL MARVIN GAYE TRIBUTE SEGMENT


 The GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony® will take place on Sunday, March 14, at 12:00 p.m. PT, and will be streamed live internationally via GRAMMY.com. Preceding the 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards® telecast, the Premiere Ceremony will be hosted by current three-time nominee Jhené Aiko and feature a number of performances by current GRAMMY nominees. Slated to perform are Nigerian singer, songwriter and rapper Burna Boy, jazz band Terri Lyne Carrington + Social Science, blues musician Jimmy "Duck" Holmes, classical pianist Igor Levit, Latin electropop musician Lido Pimienta, singer, songwriter and performance artist Poppy, and singer, songwriter and composer Rufus Wainwright.

Kicking off the event will be a tribute performance celebrating the 50th anniversary of the classic Marvin Gaye track "Mercy, Mercy Me (The Ecology)". The special all-nominee ensemble performance will feature Afro-Peruvian Jazz Orchestra, Thana Alexa, John Beasley, Camilo, Regina Carter, Alexandre Desplat, Bebel Gilberto, Lupita Infante, Sarah Jarosz, Mykal Kilgore, Ledisi, Mariachi Sol de Mexico de Jose Hernandez, PJ Morton, Gregory Porter, Grace Potter, säje, Gustavo Santaolalla (Bajofondo), Anoushka Shankar, and Kamasi Washington.

Presenting the first GRAMMY Awards of the day will be current nominees Bill Burr, Chika, Infante and former Recording Academy® Chair Jimmy Jam. Branden Chapman and Bill Freimuth are the producers on behalf of the Recording Academy, Greg Fera is executive producer and Cheche Alara will serve as music producer and musical director.

Music fans will be given unprecedented digital access to GRAMMY Awards content with GRAMMY Live, which will stream internationally on GRAMMY.com and via Facebook Live, the exclusive streaming partner of GRAMMY Live. GRAMMY Live takes viewers behind-the-scenes with backstage experiences, pre-show interviews and post-show highlights from Music’s Biggest Night®. GRAMMY Live will stream all day on March 14, including during and after the GRAMMY Awards evening telecast. IBM, the Official AI & Cloud Partner of the Recording Academy, will host GRAMMY Live for the first time entirely on the IBM Cloud.

The 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards will be broadcast live following the Premiere Ceremony on CBS and Paramount+ from 8:00 – 11:30 p.m. ET/5:00 – 8:30 p.m. PT. For GRAMMY coverage, updates and breaking news, please visit the Recording Academy's social networks on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

All of the Premiere Ceremony performers and the host are nominated this year, as are most of the presenters. Afro-Peruvian Jazz Orchestra for Best Latin Jazz Album (Tradiciones); Aiko for Album Of The Year (Chilombo), Best R&B Performance ("Lightning & Thunder" featuring John Legend) and Best Progressive R&B Album (Chilombo); Alexa for Best Jazz Vocal Album (Ona); Beasley with Somi With Frankfurt Radio Big Band for Best Jazz Vocal Album (Holy Room: Live At Alte Oper), Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album (MONK’estra Plays John Beasley), Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella ("Donna Lee") and Best Arrangement, Instrumentals and Vocals ("Asas Fechadas" with Maria Mendes); Burna Boy for Best Global Music Album (Twice As Tall); Burr for Best Comedy Album (Paper Tiger); Camilo for Best Latin Pop or Urban Album (Por Primera Vez); Carrington + Social Science for Best Jazz Instrumental Album (Waiting Game); Carter for Best Improvised Jazz Solo ("Pachamama"); Chika for Best New Artist; Desplat for Best Instrumental Composition ("Plumfield"); Gilberto for Best Global Music Album (Agora); Holmes for Best Traditional Blues Album (Cypress Grove); Infante for Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano) (La Serenata); Jarosz for Best American Roots Song ("Hometown"), Best Americana Album (World On The Ground); Kilgore for Best Traditional R&B Performance ("Let Me Go"); Ledisi for Best Traditional R&B Performance ("Anything For You"); Levit for Best Classical Instrumental Solo (Beethoven: Complete Piano Sonatas); Mariachi Sol de Mexico de Jose Hernandez for Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano) (Bailando Sones Y Huapangos Con Mariachi Sol De Mexico De Jose Hernandez); Morton for Best Gospel Album (Gospel According To PJ); Pimienta for Best Latin Rock or Alternative Album (Miss Colombia); Poppy for Best Metal Performance ("BLOODMONEY"); Porter for Best R&B Album (All Rise); Potter for Best Rock Performance ("Daylight"), Best Rock Album (Daylight); säje for Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals ("Desert Song"); Santaolalla with Bajofondo for Best Latin Rock or Alternative Album (Aura); Shankar for Best Global Music Album (Love Letters); Wainwright for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album (Unfollow The Rules); and Washington for Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media (Becoming).






ABOUT THE RECORDING ACADEMY
The Recording Academy represents the voices of performers, songwriters, producers, engineers, and all music professionals. Dedicated to ensuring the recording arts remain a thriving part of our shared cultural heritage, the Academy honors music's history while investing in its future through the GRAMMY Museum®, advocates on behalf of music creators, supports music people in times of need through MusiCares®, and celebrates artistic excellence through the GRAMMY Awards — music's only peer-recognized accolade and highest achievement. As the world's leading society of music professionals, we work year-round to foster a more inspiring world for creators.

For more information about the Academy, please visit www.grammy.com. For breaking news and exclusive content, follow @RecordingAcad on Twitter, "like" Recording Academy on Facebook, and join the Recording Academy's social communities on Instagram, YouTube, and LinkedIn.


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#LondonPeachy #CulturedPeachy @NationalGallery ARTWORKS BY SCHOOLCHILDREN FROM THE NATIONAL GALLERY’S TAKE ONE PICTURE EXHIBITION TO BE SHOWN ON OUTDOOR SCREENS - THANKS TO THE GENEROUS SUPPORT OF OCEAN OUTDOOR

The National Gallery is delighted to be teaming up again with digital out of home media owner, Ocean Outdoor, to bring artworks onto the nation’s streets.

The previous partnership (May 2020) involved works from the Gallery’s collection being displayed on large format digital screens around the UK. This time the artworks showcased have been created by primary schoolchildren as part of the Gallery’s 25th annual Take One Picture exhibition.

While the Take One Picture exhibition had to close in Trafalgar Square after just a few days in line with Government guidance, this partnership will be an opportunity for a much wider audience to see a selection of these artworks. They will appear on large format screens nationwide for two weeks, from 1-15 March.

At a time when the physical spaces of museums and galleries stand silent, we are increasingly turning to innovative digital ways of viewing and experiencing art. The Ocean Outdoor and the National Gallery partnership will bring artworks by UK schoolchildren to streets across the nation. The campaign will be displayed on more than 60 screens in six cities: Aberdeen, Birmingham, Edinburgh, Glasgow, London and Manchester.


The high impact roadside and city centre screens will show the artworks of schools in the local region where possible, in hopes that students will be able to experience the excitement of seeing the vibrant colours of their own creations up close, just translated into a different format and blown-up large scale. Some artworks will be shown beyond children's own local area, to inspire children and adults living in other communities

Each year for Take One Picture schools focus on one National Gallery Collection work and create their own artworks responding creatively to various elements in the painting including themes, subject matter, historical context or composition. This year’s focus painting is Men of the Docks (1912) by American painter George Bellows which depicts a wintry river landscape in New York with a view over Lower Manhattan; a group of longshoremen stand with their shoulders hunched to keep the cold at bay, waiting to unload a huge ocean liner behind them.

The artworks shown on the Ocean Outdoor screens depict a wide range of subjects inspired by the painting: cityscapes and skyscrapers, immigration and opportunity, the riverfront as a place of work and horses as working animals. Ranging from model ships and towering skyscrapers to painted portraits and letters home, a variety of works reflecting the richness of creative responses to Bellows’s painting will be featured. At a challenging moment, these digital screens show us the power of creativity and optimism, bright spots shining out from all over the nation.

Dr Gabriele Finaldi, Director of the National Gallery, says: ‘Art can provide inspiration and solace in these difficult times. While the Gallery doors are closed, we are hugely grateful for this generous gesture from Ocean Outdoor that is allowing us to bring the artworks of schoolchildren from the Take One Picture exhibition in London to the streets of the nation.’

Chris Standish, Ocean Outdoor head of brand partnerships, said: ‘Once again, our partnership with the National Gallery celebrates Ocean’s Art of Outdoor proposition, this time through the creative work of school children. As this latest period of lockdown begins to ease and the schools start to return, what better way to celebrate the creativity of young people than through the joy of outdoor spaces in their own neighbourhoods.’


Images
Changing Hammersmith Frieze by Year 5, West London Free School Primary, London: artwork for Oceans Outdoor screens. © The National Gallery, London
Take One Picture exhibition artwork displayed on Ocean Outdoor's screen at Holland Park Roundabout, London (c) The National Gallery, London

About Ocean Outdoor

Ocean Outdoor operates some of the most prestigious digital out of home (DOOH) locations in the UK, Northern and Continental Europe. Ocean’s portfolio includes 4,000 screens in seven countries and 351 cities.

Ocean’s UK portfolio features the most iconic DOOH locations including the BFI IMAX; the Landsec Piccadilly Lights and a significant presence in the top 13 UK cities. Ocean's high-profile landlords and partners include Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow and Southampton City Councils, Landsec, Unibail-Rodamco-Westfield, the BFI and intu.

In the UK, a continued focus on Ocean's Digital Cities for Digital Citizens philosophy has significantly augmented the Group's position as an operator of high quality DOOH assets. Ocean continues to deliver good organic development through new City tender wins, the rollout of new locations in Scotland, London, the West Midlands and Manchester and significant screen investment.

About Take One Picture

Launched in 1995, Take One Picture is the National Gallery’s countrywide scheme for primary schools. Each year the Gallery focuses on one painting from the collection to inspire cross-curricular work in primary classrooms. After a one-day Continuing Professional Development (CPD) course at the Gallery, teachers are given a print of the focus painting, a soundscape and a variety of other resources to support classroom learning. The challenge is then for schools to use the image imaginatively, both as a stimulus for artwork, and to make links across the curriculum.

Each year a selection of work produced by schools based on the painting is shown at the National Gallery and published on the website. In order to be considered for the display, schools submit examples of how a whole class or school has used the picture to inspire projects that are child-led and cross-curricular and through which children have learnt a new process and involved members of the local community.

Further information about the programme, related CPD courses for teachers, and the annual Take One Picture exhibition at the National Gallery can be found at https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/take-one-picture

About George Bellows

Born in Columbus, Ohio, in 1882, Bellows studied at the Ohio State University. He moved to New York City in 1904 to study art with Robert Henri and the group of enthusiastic young painters around him, known as the Ashcan School, who found rich subject matter in the booming metropolis. From 1907, Bellows focussed on New York City, depicting working-class subjects in an expressive style; his painting of fighting boxers remain among Bellows’s most famous works. Bellows played a key role in the organisation of the legendary Armory Show of 1913, which introduced the American public to masterworks by French Impressionists, Post-Impressionist, and Cubist painters, as well as to works by American contemporary artists. The atrocities of the First World War had a traumatic impact on Bellows, who in 1918 undertook a series of lithographs and monumental canvasses on this theme. He died in 1925 at the age of 42.

List of participating schools in 2020 Take One Picture

The full list of schools represented in the exhibition are as follows, with school artworks shown on Ocean Outdoor screens indicated with an asterisk*:

Beecroft Garden Primary School, London
Caroline Chisholm School, Northampton
Cleveland Road Primary School, Essex
Darrick Wood Infant and Nursery School, Kent
Downshall Primary School, Essex
George Betts Primary Academy, West Midlands*
Glendower Preparatory School, London
Grange Park School, Kent*
Gunthorpe Primary School, Peterborough
Headlands Primary School, Northampton*
Hill Top CE Primary School and Nursery, Bradford*
Holy Trinity CE Primary School, London
Ide Primary School, Exeter
Kenmont Primary School, London
Kingsway Community Primary School, Warwickshire
Kingsway Junior School, Hertfordshire
Kingswood Parks Primary School, Hull
Little Hallingbury C of E Primary School, Essex*
Mab's Cross Community Primary School, Lancashire*
Oakwood School, Surrey
Parkhill Junior School, London*
Preston Park Primary School, London
Ramsgate Art Primary School, Kent*
Rectory Farm Primary School, Northampton
Redlands Primary and Nursery School, Nottinghamshire*
RGS The Grange, Worcester
Rhodes Avenue Primary School, London
Sir John Sherbrooke Junior School, Nottingham
SS Peter and Paul RC Primary School, Tyne and Wear*
St Martin de Porres Catholic Primary School, Luton*
St Mary's School Hampstead, London
Stivichall Primary School, Coventry*
Stoke Bishop C of E Primary School, Bristol*
The Priory C of E Primary School, London
Tudor C of E Primary School, Suffolk
Wellington Prep School, Somerset*
West London Free School Primary, London*

Twitter @nationalgallery
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Wednesday, February 24, 2021

#SmallScreenScenes #TheHead by #HBOMax @hbomax Highly Recommended by @ManhattanPeachy #WhomYouKnow Starring #BAFTA-Winning #MoverandShaker #ChrisReilly @themediaprostudio

This has been a year like no other, and in the dark depths of February on HBO Max you'll discover mysterious mayhem in the six episodes of The Head, which you must see at least twice. Once is not enough.

There are 179 total days of darkness a year in Antarctica, and this opens with the 29th of April, the end of summer there.  A total thriller, The Head starts off with a party but decrescendos a bit in the middle.  We warn you: stay alert and stay tuned: if you don't tune in you'll miss the clincher at the end, best of all. For all Roger Ackroyd enthusiasts, and who isn't, you'll especially appreciate the plot twist.  Fast forward to the 29th of October and what exactly happened over the winter is this story.  And of course up with the 29th universally as another Mover and Shaker Chrishaunda Lee will agree.

The sound of silence punctuates scenes appropriately and the piano interludes are incredibly powerful.  Though we have yet to read it and naturally it's on our list, we have seen And Then There Were None a few times and this is something like that except for in this case there is no dinner party, they are scientists and they're in Antarctica, like in History's Greatest Mysteries and Shackleton's ice ship

The execution of light is especially stunning and the color and background effects are well done, achieving what we imagine is the desired drama. Remember their summer and winter is the opposite of ours and it is most light there from October 29th to April 29th. The cast is strong and includes Richard Sammel whom we recognize from The French Village (excellent-we saw all seasons and want to see more French tv) ; he is less scary here!

The scenery is great and the opening of Episode Six was the best in particular. Most of us aren't going to go to Antarctica so it transports you there successfully (though filmed in Iceland and Spain.) The consistency from story to setting to color to sound to mood is seamless; the colorist is to be applauded in particular. If you are familiar with Manhattan's 9 West 57th Street which is gorgeous and guess who once worked there, you know to go to 8 1/2 the restaurant downstairs you go down the spiral glass staircase. A similar staircase is in this research station and it will jump out at you if you also know the stairs we reference. Previously on Whom You Know, BAFTA-Winning Chris Reilly was featured as a Mover and Shaker. We are thrilled to present his commentary on The Head and of course he was interviewed by Peachy Deegan. You can follow Chris on Instagram.
Peachy Deegan:  We understand The Head was filmed in Iceland though it is set in Antarctica. Is this correct and if so what was it like to film in Iceland?
Chris Reilly: Most of it was filmed near Santa Cruz in Tenerife. That was lovely as my family have a place there which meant they could visit. The producers and crew were so kind to them and the crew in general were very warm, no hierarchy as far as basic human contact was concerned. It was lovely. Sunshine, good people and great food. Not as cold as it looked. Quite the opposite!

We believe this was all filmed before Covid and Lockdown; is that correct? 
Yes.

How did you originally hear about this show? 
The director contacted me through my agent and asked me to read for one of the other roles. I made it known that I preferred Nils and was expecting to have to audition. They offered it to me after a short meeting with Jorge Dorado. Very unexpected.

This series opens with a party and it looks like you are drinking scotch; is this correct and if so what kind is it and did you get to pick it or was it assigned? 
Believe it or not I was allowed to drink small amounts of watered down Spanish brandy. My character is an alcoholic and I felt it was important to the role to have a bit of that constant buzz while working. It was a big ask but everyone on the show was very understanding and put the measures in place to allow me to drink for real.

What is it like to endure such literal darkness and be so far north? 
We did film mostly at night to avoid the heat of the Island but I never actually made it to Iceland. I'd have loved to have gone.

It seems like this show originated in Spain however there are many languages and cultures that are included in it; how did this all transpire and how did it work? [Note: there are English subtitles included.]
Antarctica is an international research location. Its true to life to have such national diversity. As far as working with so many different cultures - amazing. Knowing people with different backgrounds, socializing and working with them was fantastic.

Everyone will unfortunately be able to relate to this sequestering method of living sadly because of what’s transpired in the last year; what was it like to film in such a confined space?
The producers built the set as one large complete structure. So once we were inside the habitat it really was like another world or planet. You could feel the claustrophobia and isolation. Great for creating the T3 storyline which is a syndrome Antarctic winterers often acquire to various degrees.

Do you know if the writer was influenced by Agatha Christie’s and Then There Were None or Shackleton’s explorations in the Antarctic?
The Pastor brothers make no secret of that influence. The time jumps and unreliable narrators, great devices she used to timeless effect. Beside that there were bits of Aliens, The Thing, The Shining in there. Jorge Dorado gave us detailed backstories and was very keen we explore the characters within those. So it was a very creative place all round.

How did you research the Antarctic before you started shooting? 
Jorge Dorado. It's one of the few jobs they laid all that on. Every detail. He worked for years on it.

What did you enjoy the most about your character, Nils Hedlund? 
His vulnerability. His attachment to family. His infallibility. He has made me go easier on myself for the things I cannot control.

What is the accent of your character Nils Hedlund based on? 
He's East Coast US, maybe somewhere around Philly, but his best friend is German and he's spent more adult time in international research than at home - which was risky because too much of that and it's just a bad US accent right. I hope I did okay. I kept the accent for the duration of the project.

What did you enjoy the most about working on The Head? 
The people. Hands down the wonderful, kind, caring, fraternal Spanish people and their kindness to my family.

How did you all stay warm?
We were cooled. Ice vests under the jackets to cope with the Canarian heat.

Did you have a lot of creative freedom or more creative direction with Nils? 
Bit of both. Provided I kept to the back story it was up to me to make a strong offer. Jorge had definite ideas of his own but has a lovely way of making you think that his ideas are yours.

What was the set like - was it all in Iceland? 
All in Spain. Just some externals in Iceland.

Did any of you experience Polar T3 syndrome in reality and what should our readers know about being in this state? 
No. We had too much fun in the sunshine on our days off. The hotel was a palace.

What would surprise people about shooting in extreme cold? 
I was surprised to discover that trying to act very cold is much easier when you are uncomfortably warm.

Of course you are in front of and not behind the camera-we did notice some interesting shots like through a wine glass for example. Were there any innovative shooting techniques specifically employed in this series? 
Lots. David Acereto our DOP was constantly finding ways of enhancing the shots. He's an artist.

Did you join the 300 club and if so how was it?
 I did spend 8 minutes in an Icebath out of curiosity. Id recommend it. Especially after a sauna.

Peachy thinks she might start having nightmares about doing her laundry. How can one stay safe in a laundry room? 
Lock the door behind you…..

We understand the wardrobe department makes fashion choices for all of you; are overalls going to make a comeback in the fashion world as athleisure is becoming more dominant? 
I've no idea. I've never been fashionable. I'm the last man to offer anyone advice.

How was the food-Peachy personally abhors cheesecake-did you at least have chocolate there? 
We had anything we wanted. The producers were generous that way. But the crew would bring in their own dishes on birthdays and holidays, enough for everyone. They were all about sharing, giving. There were some amazing dishes and they would compete to see who made the best.

We do not love seeing you as a corpse. How do you manage to stay so still? 
I was drunk.

Did you see any cold climate animals? We were hoping for whales, penguins or polar bears… 
Just the grips.

In Episode Six when the chair flew across the room-was that done in one take? Was that scene fun to film? 
That was Jorge's suggestion. But I don't think he would have guessed I went as far as I did with it. When they shouted cut he bounced in to the room with a massive smile, raving about the shot. The poor guys in props just stood there wondering how they could reset as I'd smashed everything on every table. We decided the first take was good enough.

What are you proudest of in The Head? 
The crew. I'm tearing a bit writing the reply. They were so kind when my God daughter and niece visited. They spent the day with her. And I wasn't special. That's just the Spanish people. They are about children and family and they give all of themselves to that and their work. I'm proud of them because they made a great show they all put their soul into. And they showed me how warm work can be.

We know The Head is on HBO Max in the USA; how are people watching it in other countries that you know of? 
It's all over. Literally worldwide on different networks. Mediapro have done an amazing job selling a show that they had utter faith in from the beginning.

Is there anything else you would like our readers to know about The Head? Katharine O'Donnelly. A woman to watch. She's going places.

Will there be a Season Two of The Head? Unlikely...

There's never been a better time to join others in the free world solitary confinement, and the importance of background checks and due diligence has never been more pronounced.

Channel your inner Poirot and use your gray cells to deduce who the killer is: The Head on HBO Max is Highly Recommended by Whom You Know.

Directed by Jorge Dorado (“The Pier,” “Mindscape”), THE HEAD is a six-episode survival thriller set in an isolated and inaccessible Antarctic research station in which winter has fallen on the South Pole, and the sun will soon disappear for the next six months. A small team, known as the Winterers, will remain at the Polaris VI Antarctic Research Station to continue their innovative research, a crucial part in the fight against climate change, under the command of renowned biologist Arthur Wilde (John Lynch). But when spring comes, summer commander Johan Berg (Alexander Willaume) returns to the station only to find the entire team are either dead or missing. A killer is on the loose, and Annika (Laura Bach), Johan's wife, is missing. If he wants to find her alive, he will have to trust Maggie (Katharine O’Donnelly), the young doctor who is profoundly shaken and apparently the sole survivor from the group… or, is there someone else?

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#PeachyandtheCity #C21isBack CENTURY 21 STORES ANNOUNCES THE LEGENDARY BRAND WILL BE BACK !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Peachy Deegan has shopped at Century 21 since she moved to Manhattan in the summer of 2000.  She has been devastated by its close.  To that end, we could not be more thrilled to tell you:

Never count out a New Yorker. In response to the outpouring of love from the Big Apple and the admiration of their loyal shoppers from around the world, Century 21 Stores announced they will officially relaunch the beloved institution in 2021. While the specifics of where and when are still being finalized, the plan has one goal in mind: to bring shopping joy to Century 21's faithful local customers while introducing that very same excitement to new fans across the globe.
The Gindis, the family behind the icon, have always held true to the foundation upon which Century 21 was built: to deliver outstanding value to consumers. Following the bankruptcy, the Gindi family bought back the intellectual property of the Century 21 brand, ensuring that Century 21 Stores will continue to be a family-run business with a name synonymous with value and luxury. 

They are determined to be a beacon of hope for the city and country.
Global expansion as well as the relaunch of the brand in New York and across the country will be announced in the coming weeks.

#C21isBack

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#LondonPeachy #CulturedPeachy @NationalGallery #PoussinandtheDance 9 October 2021 – 2 January 2022


9 October 2021 – 2 January 2022

Ground Floor Galleries

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A landmark exhibition of works by Nicolas Poussin (1594–1665) – the first ever to focus on his pictures of dancers and revellers – will open at the National Gallery in autumn 2021.

Nicolas Poussin is an artist’s artist. For centuries, his works have been hugely influential, inspiring artists as diverse as David and Cézanne, Picasso and Bacon. Yet Poussin is sometimes overlooked by the public who often find his paintings cold, difficult or overly erudite. Art historians have tended to characterise him as a philosopher, rather than a painter, and his pictures are rarely presented in a warm or approachable way. Poussin and the Dance intends to challenge this perception, exploring a part of the artist’s production that has never been examined before: his depictions of dance.

Poussin and the Dance will include wild, raucous and surprisingly joyous scenes, showing whirling, cavorting figures who are either half-naked or too drunk to hold themselves up. It will cast the French classical artist in a completely new light, showing how he grappled with the challenges of arresting movement and capturing the expressive potential of the body.


Around twenty paintings and drawings from public and private collections around the world will be shown for the first time alongside some of the celebrated Classical antiquities that inspired them. These works are being seen together for the first time in a generation and will allow visitors to trace Poussin’s influences and the sophisticated translations he made between marble, paint and paper.


The exhibition focuses on Poussin’s early Roman career, from his arrival in the city in 1624 until about 1640 when he was called back to France to serve as First Painter to the King under Louis XIII.

As a young man, Poussin was desperate to get to Rome. Finally arriving in the city on his third attempt – having had two thwarted journeys take him as far as Florence and Lyon – he threw himself into the Classical world he saw around him, drawing inspiration from antique sculptures and bas reliefs as well as the works of artists such as Titian and Raphael. Many of the most celebrated antiquities he knew depicted dancers, and soon Poussin himself took on the challenge of capturing dance on paper, in paint, and even in clay. When choreographing his compositions, he created wax figurines which he arranged in a kind of model theatre. Key to bringing Poussin and his working methods to life in the exhibition will be not only the juxtaposition of antiquities, drawings and paintings, but also a reconstruction of this unusual studio tool, the artist’s model theatre or ‘grande machine’.


This exhibition offers visitors the opportunity to rediscover Poussin in a fresh, new, exciting light, to appreciate the paradox between his diligent working process and the joyful, carefree scenes he created, as well as the ingenious solutions he found to bring the dances and riotous movement of the ancient world to life.


Exhibition organised by the National Gallery, London and the Getty Museum, Los Angeles.


Nicolas Poussin was born at Les Andelys in Normandy and first trained in Rouen. From 1612 he lived in Paris and in 1624 travelled via Venice to Rome, where he stayed for most of his life.

His sensuous early canvases such as The Nurture of Bacchus reflect 16th-century Venetian art, especially that of Titian. He studied antique remains and his art reflects both this and an appreciation of Raphael.

Poussin read ancient writers such as Ovid and attempted to recreate ancient myth and history in his works.

Poussin mainly painted easel paintings for private patrons. His larger works for Louis XIII, made from 1640 to 1642 on his return to Paris, were less successful. His scholarly patrons in Rome and Paris included the antiquarian Cassiano dal Pozzo and the notable art collector, Cardinal Richelieu.

Poussin sketched in the Campagna, the countryside around Rome, with Claude, and from the late 1630s began to paint landscapes. He brought a powerful discipline to the composition of his paintings, which enhanced the solemnity of their subjects. In his later years he developed an intensely personal style in his religious and allegorical works.

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Tuesday, February 23, 2021

#ReadThis @AgathaChristie @HarperCollins @Morrow_PB #MidwinterMurder by #AgathaChristie #ShortStories #Mystery Fireside Tales from the #QueenofMystery

 
Baby it's cold outside and no one can heat up the pages like Agatha Christie!  With her literary fireside chats of escapades and danger, Agatha is once again lighting up your life with her words of excitement and tales of what just might happen to you, if there was no lockdown that is.  And just how do you keep new potatoes???

If you are into short stories, this has your name all over it.  If you like stories in fun-size like little chocolates, this is also for you and it includes The Chocolate Box, the only story where Poirot makes a mistake.  You will find Poirot in some of these but not all of these stories.  

We are taking a break from the first ten Hercule Poirot novels, previously featured:

The Mysterious Affair at Styles

Murder on the Links

Poirot Investigates

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd

The Big Four

The Mystery of the Blue Train

Peril at End House

Lord Edgware Dies

Murder on the Orient Express

Three Act Tragedy 

It kicks off with Three Blind Mice, which has turned into the longest running play ever: The Mousetrap.  Peachy is not into plays but she wants to see this now.  With the record-setting recent snowfall here especially this month, the setting could not be more significant.  The Mystery of Hunter's Lodge is also in Poirot Investigates.

We meet Miss Marple, the other major Christie detective, in A Christmas Tragedy.  Though Christmas is over for this season the Christmas spirit is keeping everyone going through this cold winter!  New Year's Eve cheer is included in The Coming of Mr. Quin so wear your best harlequin diamonds.  You'll also meet the famous sleuthing couple Tommy and Tuppence in The Red House. 

If the beach is more your style, you'll find that here too and it's in Europe: entirely a vacation.  Problem at Pollensa Bay is not nearly the problem of lockdowns and neither is The World's End in presumably gorgeous Corsica.  Escape your own problems!  And Mr. Parker Pyne is delightful and we wish he was part of the New York social circuit.  We liked the full circle of Sanctuary, and Christmas Adventure closed it all quite nicely.

The Penultimate tale, The Manhood of Edward Robinson, was definitely our favorite in all its Gatsby-esque glory.

Midwinter Murder is Highly Recommended by Whom You Know!

https://www.agathachristie.com/





About the Author
Agatha Christie is the most widely published author of all time and in any language, outsold only in the Bible and Shakespeare. Her books have sold more than a billion copies in English and another billion in a hundred foreign languages. She is the author of eighty crime novels and short-story collections, around thirty plays, two memoirs, and six novels written under the name Mary Westmacott

She first tried her hand at detective fiction while working in a hospital dispensary during World War I, creating the now-legendary Hercule Prior with her debut novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles. In 1930, Miss Jane Marple made her first full-length novel appearance in The Murder at the Vicarage, quickly becoming another beloved and enduring character to rival Poirot's popularity. Additional series characters include the husband-and wife crime-fighting team of Tommy and Tuppence Beresford, private investigator Parker Pyne, and Scotland Yard detectives Superintendent Battle and Inspector Japp.

Many of Christie's novels and short stories were adapted into plays, films, and television series. The Mousetrap opened in 1952 and is the longest running play in history. Academy Award-nominated actor and director Kenneth Branagh helmed the acclaimed major motion picture Murder on the Orient Express in 2017 and its sequel, Death on the Nile, starring in both films as the Belgian detective. On the small screen Poirot has been most memorably portrayed by David Suchet, and Miss Marple by Joan Hickson and subsequently Geraldine McEwan and Julia McKenzie.

Christie was first married to Archibald Christie and then to archaeologist Sir Max Mallowan, whom she accompanied on expeditions to countries that would also serve as the settings for many of her novels. In 1971 she achieved one of Britain's highest honors when she was made a Dame of the British Empire. She died in 1976 at the age of eighty-five. The one-hundred-year anniversary of Agatha Christie stories and the debut of Hercule Poirot was celebrated around the world in 2020. Whom You Know will never stop celebrating it!

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